'Pope Francis Articles'

Pope Francis Reacts Divinely To Little Girl Snatching His Skullcap

Posted on 09. Apr, 2017 by .

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Taken from Huffingtonpost.com –

Blessed be this adorable little girl who tried to swipe Pope Francis’ skullcap.

Estella, 3, was being held up to meet the pontiff at the Vatican on Wednesday morning when she cheekily swiped the white cap straight from his head.

“We thought it was hilarious!” said Catholic blogger Mountain Butorac, who posted the footage of his popehat-24-1490331546goddaughter online.

“Unexpected for sure,” he told The Huffington Post via email. “But to see everyone laugh, including the pope, was amazing!”

Butorac said he took Estella’s family to the pope’s weekly audience while they were visiting him in Rome, Italy.

With the video going viral, he said he loved the fact “that people are getting a chance to see a clip from the Holy Father in a fun situation.”

“The news is all so toxic lately,” he added. “It’s nice to have something light and fun!”

 

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Pope Francis’s World Day of Peace Message

Posted on 18. Dec, 2016 by .

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Greetings of peace!  This morning Pope Francis released his World Day of Peace Message at a press conference at the Vatican.  This is the 50th annual World Day of Peace Message — which will be officially proclaimed on January 1and the first ever on Nonviolence.

Click here for an article by Rev. John Deer regarding Pope Francis’s message

Pope Francis’s World Day of Peace Message:

PDFs:

English , Spanish ]

 

Nonviolence: a Style of Politics for Peace

1. At the beginning of this New Year, I offer heartfelt wishes of peace to the world’s peoples and nations, to heads of state and government, and to religious, civic and community leaders. I wish peace to every man, woman and child, and I pray that the image and likeness of God in each person will enable us to acknowledge one another as sacred gifts endowed with immense dignity. Especially in situations of conflict, let us respect this, our “deepest dignity”,[1] and make active nonviolence our way of life.

This is the fiftieth Message for the World Day of Peace. In the first, Blessed Pope Paul VI addressed all peoples, not simply Catholics, with utter clarity. “Peace is the only true direction of human progress – and not the tensions caused by ambitious nationalisms, nor conquests by violence, nor repressions which serve as mainstay for a false civil order”. He warned of “the danger of believing that international controversies cannot be resolved by the ways of reason, that is, by negotiations founded on law, justice, and equity, but only by means of deterrent and murderous forces.” Instead, citing the encyclical Pacem in Terris of his predecessor Saint John XXIII, he extolled “the sense and love of peace founded upon truth, justice, freedom and love”. [2] In the intervening fifty years, these words have lost none of their significance or urgency.

On this occasion, I would like to reflect on nonviolence as a style of politics for peace. I ask God to help all of us to cultivate nonviolence in our most personal thoughts and values. May charity and nonviolence govern how we treat each other as individuals, within society and in international life. When victims of violence are able to resist the temptation to retaliate, they become the most credible promotors of nonviolent peacemaking. In the most local and ordinary situations and in the international order, may nonviolence become the hallmark of our decisions, our relationships and our actions, and indeed of political life in all its forms.

 

 

 

A broken world

2. While the last century knew the devastation of two deadly World Wars, the threat of nuclear war and a great number of other conflicts, today, sadly, we find ourselves engaged in a horrifying world war fought piecemeal. It is not easy to know if our world is presently more or less violent than in the past, or to know whether modern means of communications and greater mobility have made us more aware of violence, or, on the other hand, increasingly inured to it.

In any case, we know that this “piecemeal” violence, of different kinds and levels, causes great suffering: wars in different countries and continents; terrorism, organized crime and unforeseen acts of violence; the abuses suffered by migrants and victims of human trafficking; and the devastation of the environment. Where does this lead? Can violence achieve any goal of lasting value? Or does it merely lead to retaliation and a cycle of deadly conflicts that benefit only a few “warlords”?

Violence is not the cure for our broken world. Countering violence with violence leads at best to forced migrations and enormous suffering, because vast amounts of resources are diverted to military ends and away from the everyday needs of young people, families experiencing hardship, the elderly, the infirm and the great majority of people in our world. At worst, it can lead to the death, physical and spiritual, of many people, if not of all.

 

 

 

The Good News

3. Jesus himself lived in violent times. Yet he taught that the true battlefield, where violence and peace meet, is the human heart: for “it is from within, from the human heart, that evil intentions come” (Mk 7:21). But Christ’s message in this regard offers a radically positive approach. He unfailingly preached God’s unconditional love, which welcomes and forgives. He taught his disciples to love their enemies (cf. Mt 5:44) and to turn the other cheek (cf. Mt 5:39). When he stopped her accusers from stoning the woman caught in adultery (cf. Jn 8:1-11), and when, on the night before he died, he told Peter to put away his sword (cf. Mt26:52), Jesus marked out the path of nonviolence. He walked that path to the very end, to the cross, whereby he became our peace and put an end to hostility (cf. Eph 2:14-16). Whoever accepts the Good News of Jesus is able to acknowledge the violence within and be healed by God’s mercy, becoming in turn an instrument of reconciliation. In the words of Saint Francis of Assisi: “As you announce peace with your mouth, make sure that you have greater peace in your hearts”.[3]

To be true followers of Jesus today also includes embracing his teaching about nonviolence. As my predecessor Benedict XVI observed, that teaching “is realistic because it takes into account that in the world there is too much violence, too much injustice, and therefore that this situation cannot be overcome except by countering it with more love, with more goodness. This ‘more’comes from God”.[4] He went on to stress that: “For Christians, nonviolence is not merely tactical behaviour but a person’s way of being, the attitude of one who is so convinced of God’s love and power that he or she is not afraid to tackle evil with the weapons of love and truth alone. Love of one’s enemy constitutes the nucleus of the ‘Christian revolution’”.[5] The Gospel command to love your enemies (cf. Lk 6:27) “is rightly considered the magna carta of Christian nonviolence. It does not consist in succumbing to evil…, but in responding to evil with good (cf. Rom 12:17-21), and thereby breaking the chain of injustice”.[6]

 

 

 

More powerful than violence

4. Nonviolence is sometimes taken to mean surrender, lack of involvement and passivity, but this is not the case. When Mother Teresa received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979, she clearly stated her own message of active nonviolence: “We in our family don’t need bombs and guns, to destroy to bring peace – just get together, love one another… And we will be able to overcome all the evil that is in the world”.[7] For the force of arms is deceptive. “While weapons traffickers do their work, there are poor peacemakers who give their lives to help one person, then another and another and another”; for such peacemakers, Mother Teresa is “a symbol, an icon of our times”.[8] Last September, I had the great joy of proclaiming her a Saint. I praised her readiness to make herself available for everyone “through her welcome and defence of human life, those unborn and those abandoned and discarded… She bowed down before those who were spent, left to die on the side of the road, seeing in them their God-given dignity; she made her voice heard before the powers of this world, so that they might recognize their guilt for the crimes – the crimes! – of poverty they created”.[9] In response, her mission – and she stands for thousands, even millions of persons – was to reach out to the suffering, with generous dedication, touching and binding up every wounded body, healing every broken life.

The decisive and consistent practice of nonviolence has produced impressive results. The achievements of Mahatma Gandhi and Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan in the liberation of India, and of Dr Martin Luther King Jr in combating racial discrimination will never be forgotten. Women in particular are often leaders of nonviolence, as for example, was Leymah Gbowee and the thousands of Liberian women, who organized pray-ins and nonviolent protest that resulted in high-level peace talks to end the second civil war in Liberia.

Nor can we forget the eventful decade that ended with the fall of Communist regimes in Europe. The Christian communities made their own contribution by their insistent prayer and courageous action. Particularly influential were the ministry and teaching of Saint John Paul II. Reflecting on the events of 1989 in his 1991 Encyclical Centesimus Annus, my predecessor highlighted the fact that momentous change in the lives of people, nations and states had come about “by means of peaceful protest, using only the weapons of truth and justice”.[10] This peaceful political transition was made possible in part “by the non-violent commitment of people who, while always refusing to yield to the force of power, succeeded time after time in finding effective ways of bearing witness to the truth”. Pope John Paul went on to say: “May people learn to fight for justice without violence, renouncing class struggle in their internal disputes and war in international ones”.[11]

The Church has been involved in nonviolent peacebuilding strategies in many countries, engaging even the most violent parties in efforts to build a just and lasting peace.

Such efforts on behalf of the victims of injustice and violence are not the legacy of the Catholic Church alone, but are typical of many religious traditions, for which “compassion and nonviolence are essential elements pointing to the way of life”.[12] I emphatically reaffirm that “no religion is terrorist”.[13] Violence profanes the name of God.[14] Let us never tire of repeating: “The name of God cannot be used to justify violence. Peace alone is holy. Peace alone is holy, not war!”[15]

 

 

 

The domestic roots of a politics of nonviolence

5. If violence has its source in the human heart, then it is fundamental that nonviolence be practised before all else within families. This is part of that joy of love which I described last March in my Exhortation Amoris Laetitia, in the wake of two years of reflection by the Church on marriage and the family. The family is the indispensable crucible in which spouses, parents and children, brothers and sisters, learn to communicate and to show generous concern for one another, and in which frictions and even conflicts have to be resolved not by force but by dialogue, respect, concern for the good of the other, mercy and forgiveness.[16] From within families, the joy of love spills out into the world and radiates to the whole of society.[17] An ethics of fraternity and peaceful coexistence between individuals and among peoples cannot be based on the logic of fear, violence and closed-mindedness, but on responsibility, respect and sincere dialogue. Hence, I plead for disarmament and for the prohibition and abolition of nuclear weapons: nuclear deterrence and the threat of mutual assured destruction are incapable of grounding such an ethics.[18] I plead with equal urgency for an end to domestic violence and to the abuse of women and children.

The Jubilee of Mercy that ended in November encouraged each one of us to look deeply within and to allow God’s mercy to enter there. The Jubilee taught us to realize how many and diverse are the individuals and social groups treated with indifference and subjected to injustice and violence. They too are part of our “family”; they too are our brothers and sisters. The politics of nonviolence have to begin in the home and then spread to the entire human family. “Saint Therese of Lisieux invites us to practise the little way of love, not to miss out on a kind word, a smile or any small gesture which sows peace and friendship. An integral ecology is also made up of simple daily gestures that break with the logic of violence, exploitation and selfishness”.[19]

 

 

 

My invitation

6. Peacebuilding through active nonviolence is the natural and necessary complement to the Church’s continuing efforts to limit the use of force by the application of moral norms; she does so by her participation in the work of international institutions and through the competent contribution made by so many Christians to the drafting of legislation at all levels. Jesus himself offers a “manual” for this strategy of peacemaking in the Sermon on the Mount. The eight Beatitudes (cf. Mt 5:3-10) provide a portrait of the person we could describe as blessed, good and authentic. Blessed are the meek, Jesus tells us, the merciful and the peacemakers, those who are pure in heart, and those who hunger and thirst for justice.

This is also a programme and a challenge for political and religious leaders, the heads of international institutions, and business and media executives: to apply the Beatitudes in the exercise of their respective responsibilities. It is a challenge to build up society, communities and businesses by acting as peacemakers. It is to show mercy by refusing to discard people, harm the environment, or seek to win at any cost. To do so requires “the willingness to face conflict head on, to resolve it and to make it a link in the chain of a new process”.[20] To act in this way means to choose solidarity as a way of making history and building friendship in society. Active nonviolence is a way of showing that unity is truly more powerful and more fruitful than conflict. Everything in the world is inter-connected.[21] Certainly differences can cause frictions. But let us face them constructively and non-violently, so that “tensions and oppositions can achieve a diversified and life-giving unity,” preserving “what is valid and useful on both sides”.[22]

I pledge the assistance of the Church in every effort to build peace through active and creative nonviolence. On 1 January 2017, the new Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development will begin its work. It will help the Church to promote in an ever more effective way “the inestimable goods of justice, peace, and the care of creation” and concern for “migrants, those in need, the sick, the excluded and marginalized, the imprisoned and the unemployed, as well as victims of armed conflict, natural disasters, and all forms of slavery and torture”.[23] Every such response, however modest, helps to build a world free of violence, the first step towards justice and peace.

 

 

 

In conclusion

7. As is traditional, I am signing this Message on 8 December, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Mary is the Queen of Peace. At the birth of her Son, the angels gave glory to God and wished peace on earth to men and women of good will (cf. Luke 2:14). Let us pray for her guidance.

“All of us want peace. Many people build it day by day through small gestures and acts; many of them are suffering, yet patiently persevere in their efforts to be peacemakers”.[24] In 2017, may we dedicate ourselves prayerfully and actively to banishing violence from our hearts, words and deeds, and to becoming nonviolent people and to building nonviolent communities that care for our common home. “Nothing is impossible if we turn to God in prayer. Everyone can be an artisan of peace”.[25]

 

 

 

From the Vatican, 8 December 2016

 

 

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Pope Francis: “Appeal for Peace”

Posted on 13. Oct, 2016 by .

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“Everyone can be an artisan of peace”

At the world day of prayer for peace gathering in Assisi, Pope Francis offered these words below:

“This is the spirit that animates us: to bring about encounters through dialogue, and to oppose every form of violence and abuse of religion which seeks to justify war and terrorism…People do not always understand that war harms the world, leaving in its wake a legacy of sorrows and hate. In war, everyone loses, including the victors.”

At the Pope’s morning homily that same day he said: “And God is the God of peace. There is no god of war…it is the devil who wants to kill everyone…If we now shut our ears to the cry of these people who are suffering under the bombs, who suffer the exploitation of arms dealers, it may be that when it happens to us, we will not be heard,” the Pope reflected. “We cannot turn a deaf ear to the cry of pain of our brothers and sisters who are suffering from war.”

Referring to the idea of justifying war, Cardinal Turkson, head of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace explained: “In that case, Pope Francis would say: ‘You don’t stop an aggression by being an aggressor. You don’t stop a conflict by inciting another conflict. You don’t stop a war by starting another war.’”

“It doesn’t stop,” said the cardinal. “We’ve seen it all around us. Trying to stop the aggressor in Iraq has not stopped war. Trying to stop the aggressor in Libya has not stopped war. It’s not stopped the war in any place. We do not stop war by starting another war.”

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Pope: No Dirty Money for the Church

Posted on 11. Apr, 2016 by .

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The following is from the Catholic News Service:

Pope Francis speaks during his general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican March 2. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) See POPE-AUDIENCE-SACRIFICE March 2, 2016.

Pope Francis speaks during his general audience in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican March 2. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) See POPE-AUDIENCE-SACRIFICE March 2, 2016.

Speaking out against exploitation and unfair wages for workers, Pope Francis told benefactors to forget about donating money to the church if their earnings came from mistreating others.

“Please, take your check back and burn it,” he said to applause.

“The people of God — that is, the church — don’t need dirty money. They need hearts that are open to God’s mercy,” the pope said March 2 during his general audience in St. Peter’s Square.

God wants people to turn away from evil and do what is just, not cover up their sins with gestures of sacrifice, he said.

Just as God derives no pleasure from “the blood of bulls and lambs” slaughtered in his name, he is especially averse to offerings from hands dirty with the blood of another human being.

“I think of some church benefactors who come with an offering,” he said, and sometimes that offering is “fruit of the blood of many people, who are exploited, mistreated, enslaved by poorly paid work.”

The pope said he would tell these donors to go away because God wants sinners “with purified hands” who have changed course, avoid evil and work for what is good and just, like aiding the oppressed and defending the weak.

“I am thinking of many, many refugees who are landing in Europe and don’t know where to go,” he said.

At his general audience, the pope continued a series of talks dedicated to the Year of Mercy by focusing on how God is able to unconditionally love, beseech and correct his sinning children.

Just like the father of a family, God cares for his people by teaching them, guiding them to freely choose the good and help others, and correcting them when they make a mistake.

The prophet Isaiah presents God as an “affectionate, but also an alert and strict father,” the pope said.

God points out the infidelity and corruption of his people, and shows his bitterness and disappointment in order to help them recognize their sin and “bring them back to the path of justice,” he said.

“Even though he is hurt, God lets love do the talking and he appeals to the conscience of these degenerate children so they mend their ways and let themselves be loved again,” the pope said.

One role parents have is to help their children use their freedom responsibly, but it is human sin which causes people to see freedom as a “pretense for autonomy, for pride,” and pride leads to conflict and “the illusion of self-sufficiency.”

People belong to God as his children, and as such, should live in loving, trusting obedience, recognizing that “everything is a gift that comes from the father’s love,” he said.

Pope Francis said refusing God and his paternity renders life rootless, bare and unlivable.

“The consequence of sin, he said, is a state of suffering,” which also serves to help people become accountable and face “the desolate emptiness” of choosing death over life.

“Suffering — the inevitable consequence of a self-destructive decision — must make the sinner reflect in order to open him or her up to conversion and forgiveness,” Pope Francis said.

For the God of mercy and love, “punishment becomes an instrument to stimulate reflection,” he said. God “always leaves the door of hope open,” patiently waiting for the moment the sinner is ready to listen and convert.

The road to salvation, therefore, isn’t ritual sacrifice, it is doing what is right and just in the eyes of God, he said.

Ritual sacrifice is condemned because, “instead of showing conversion, it claims to replace it,” he said, “creating the deceptive belief that sacrifices are what save, not the divine mercy that forgives sins.”

Just as people go see the doctor when they are ill, people who are afflicted with the debilitating effects of sin should turn to God — not a “witch doctor” or other false and mistaken paths. Only God offers true healing.

No matter what people have done, God never disowns or turns anyone away, he said. Even “the evilest person” in the world will always be one of his children, the pope said.

“He will always say, ‘Child, come.’ And this is our father’s love and this is God’s mercy. Having a father like this gives us hope and faith,” he said.

Freely and forever, God will always turn the gravest of sins, “white as snow,” the pope said. “This is the miracle of God’s love.”

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The Supreme Court & Pope Francis

Posted on 26. Feb, 2016 by .

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The following is from the Sacramento Bee

People walk on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on Saturday April 26, 2014. The Supreme Court is considering whether police may search cellphones found on people they arrest without first getting a warrant. The court’s latest foray into the issue of privacy in the digital age involves two cases being argued Tuesday that arose from searches of phones carried by a gang member and a drug dealer. Police looked through their cellphones after taking the suspects into custody and found evidence that led to their convictions and lengthy prison terms. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Prudence is weighing the possible, determining how to achieve the most good and avoiding unnecessary evil. This is the task before the U.S. Supreme Court as it considers President Barack Obama’s executive action to provide temporary relief for some immigrant youths and parents by deferring deportations.

It is not an amnesty program, nor does it fix the broken immigration system. Any significant reform will have to wait for a more reasoned conversation in Congress. In the meantime, what the administration is proposing gives a modicum of security to many aspiring Americans living in ambiguity and allows federal and local law enforcement to effectively allocate resources to protect our neighborhoods, not divide them.

When speaking last September to a joint session of Congress, Pope Francis held up the ancient biblical figure of Moses, the “patriarch and lawgiver.” The Lord gave the law through Moses as a sign and a force for unity. The law was also intended to lead Moses’ people to an understanding of their innate human dignity in the eyes of the creator.

The Supreme Court justices who were present for this message will do well to keep these principles in mind as they deliberate Texas v. United States. Ultimately, laws must serve people and the common good. While we wait for Congress to assume this duty with regards to comprehensive and humane immigration reform, the court can call on the wisdom of Moses to bring a measure of unity and security to immigrant families as well as the nation.

On Wednesday, Pope Francis will again look out on the United States. This time, he will do so from the tumultuous Mexican metropolis of Ciudad Juarez. From there he and others will gaze across to the neighboring city of El Paso, Texas, separated by the border.

Religious celebrations will be held on both sides of the Rio Grande due to harsh political realities that still keep neighbors apart. Technology will help bridge that divide. The two venues will become virtually one. It is most likely, though, that bellows of buoyant hope will echo over both sides of that seemingly insurmountable barrier. It will be a common voice of hope. May the minds and hearts of the justices be tuned to that message.

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