'Justice'

Homeless Shelter at St. Boniface

Posted on 03. Dec, 2016 by .

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On November 21, a press conference was held at St. Boniface Church, San Francisco. This was the first night of the Interfaith Winter Shelter Program in San Francisco that is hosted by four churches:  a Lutheran congregation, a Unitarian community, and two Catholic parishes.
St. Boniface Church
Franklin Fong, OFM

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Urge ICE to Release Huntington Beach member

Posted on 14. Nov, 2016 by .

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Our friend Kapi, father of 2 US Citizens and small business owner, is a valued member of the Huntington Beach, community, and was unjustly re-detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on September 20th. His deportation officer failed to notify him or his attorney that his requested stay of removal had been denied back in May and months later we was picked up by ICE without an opportunity to appeal his case.  We are calling for his immediate release, and administrative closure of his case, due to the negligence of his deportation officer.

Today his family, friends and community will be having a press conference outside of Theo Lacy to make these demands. Black immigrants are detained for longer periods of time and deported at a higher rate. We make a stance against this racist system!

You can support by signing this petition:

Petition: Release Kapi from Detention 

Making a call to ICE: 

FOD Norma Bonales: 213-830-7912

Theo Lacy AFOD Quinones: 714-712-845

Sample Script:

“We demand the immediate release of Chansa Kapijimpana A# 097-680-530 from Theo Lacy. He is the father of 2 US Citizen children and a beloved community member. He is supported by congressional representatives and should be returned to his community”

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National Homelessness & Hunger Awareness Week

Posted on 26. Oct, 2016 by .

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November 12-20, 2016 is National Homelessness and Hunger Awareness Week, sponsored by the National Coalition for the Homeless.  This year, the National Coalition is focusing Homelessness and Hunger Awareness Week on criminalization: laws passed by local governments which prevent people experiencing homelessness from doing life-sustaining activities.

The report from the Policy Advocacy Clinic at Berkeley Law School details the enactment and enforcement of anti-homeless laws in California. They found that California cities have responded to homelessness with laws that criminalize behavior specific to homeless people: sitting, lying down, resting, begging, and sharing food in public places.

Click here to view the report

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New ICBM Cost Estimates

Posted on 26. Oct, 2016 by .

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The U.S. plans to replace Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) with new ICBMs. The cost estimates for the new ICBMs have continued to increase and now range from $62 to $100+ billion. Take a look below and click here for a printable version.

New ICBMs cost estimates Final.png

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Iran Nuclear Deal: Correcting Misconceptions

Posted on 26. Oct, 2016 by .

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Taken from armscontrolcenter.org –

1. Misconception: The Iran Deal included a U.S. payment of $150 billion to Iran

The Facts:

The money that Iran receives from complying with the agreement is not a direct payment from the U.S. government. Instead, the funds are Iranian foreign assets, which the international sanctions regime prevented Iran from accessing. Under the JCPOA, these nuclear-related sanctions were waived after Iran verifiably completed its initial obligations.

The $150 billion figure is also inaccurate. The amount of money Iran could access from these foreign reserves is about $100 billion. Of this amount, about half of it is tied up in Iranian foreign debts and entanglements. As Treasury Secretary, Jacob Lew, testified before Congress, the actual amount that Iran would be able to use is about $50 billion.

2. Misconception: The Iran deal included a ransom payment for hostages

The Facts:

After implementation of the Iran Deal, the United States sent $1.7 billion to Iran. Some are now claiming this was a ransom payment for the return of American citizens that were being held hostage by Iran.

Lisa Grosh, a legal advisor for the Department of State, testified before Congress that the $1.7 billion was comprised of $400 million that Iran had placed in a U.S. Foreign Military Sales trust fund and $1.3 billion in interest. At the time of the Iran deal negotiations, the United States and Iran were involved in a legal arbitration case over the amount of interest the U.S. owed on this fund.

As for the fact that the payment coincided with the hostages’ release, Suzanne Maloney of the Brookings Center explains that “the settlement and the prisoner release were two separate channels.” Once the settlement of the claim was determined, the U.S. simply did not issue payment until the separately-negotiated prisoner release was completed.

3. Misconception: “Breakout time” is the time needed to develop a nuclear bomb

The Facts:

Under the JCPOA, Iran’s “breakout time” is evaluated to be at least one year. But there is an important distinction between the “breakout time” and the amount of time needed to develop a credible nuclear weapon. A country’s “breakout time” is the time required to produce enough weapons-grade uranium or plutonium for one nuclear weapon. The International Atomic Energy Agency estimates this amount to be about 25kg of highly enriched uranium (90% or more of enrichment). However, even if Iran had the required amount and enrichment level of uranium for a nuclear bomb, it would still need time to develop a viable weapon. This includes miniaturizing a nuclear weapon to be attached to a missile and producing a missile that functions accurately and reliably. Both of these developments are challenging and time-consuming. Furthermore, one untested nuclear weapon is not enough for a credible deterrent.

4. Misconception: The Iran Deal stopped Iran’s Nuclear Program

The Facts:

The objective of the JCPOA was to verifiably constrain Iran’s nuclear program and impede progress towards a nuclear weapon. However, the agreement does permit Iran to keep a comparatively small amount of monitored low-enriched uranium. Thus, the Iran Deal does not extinguish all Iranian nuclear activity, but constrains and restricts Iran’s ability to obtain a nuclear weapon. To learn more about Iran’s obligations under the agreement, view the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation’s factsheet.

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